Librarian Annotated Bibliography Example

Published: 2021-07-06 04:05:04
essay essay

Category: Government, Games, Europe, Nationalism, Nation, Olympics, Spain, European Union

Type of paper: Essay

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Thesis Statement
When stateless nations are discussed most often the Eastern European states of the former USSR are given as examples. But some may be surprised to know that in Europe stateless nations still exist. The tension over their autonomy and the use of their culture is still an issue.
Kosovo of the former Republic of Yugoslavia is the most recent “stateless state” that has succeeded, for the time being anyway, as being recognized as an independent state and a member of the European Union. Will other stateless nations have the same good fortune?
Cyprus is the one of the oldest divided nations. The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus is often termed a stateless nation.
The terrorist group, ETA, who has been demanding rights for the Basque country in Spain, has recently agreed to stop using violence to gain its goals. But what of the stateless nation of Catalan which almost disappeared under Franco’s regime?
I suggest that Catalan will have more success in Spain now in gaining respect and perhaps more autonomy with the young generation of political savvy voters. At the least I see a renewed interest in Catalan culture and the importance of the Catalan heritage to Spain.
Annotated Bibliography
“Catalans Tell Business to Forget Fears on Language; Firms in Spain Have Adapted to Legislation.” Western Mail. April 21, 2009. p.10.
Global businesses such as Google and Microsoft have met the language inclusions set in law and other businesses should not have a problem either.
The article in the newspaper, Western Mail reports, “Catalan is spoken by around 68% of the territory's 13 million residents, and language legislation was strengthened by a new constitution introduced in 2006.” (p. 10)
As long as enough people speak a language it can still be recognized in the business world as practical to know.
Delgado, Maria M. Calixto Bieito: a Catalan Director on the International Stage. TheatreForum. 26. 2005.
Catalan film director Calixto Bieito may not be a household name but he has had a strong influence on directors in the film industry and has become more identified since the mid-1990’s with productions presented at the Edinburgh Festival.
“While his international reputation has primarily been forged around revisionist, aggressive productions of the classical canon that travel well across the festival market, Bieito's early career was defiantly marked by a pliant versatility,” explains Del Gado.
With recognition of talented artists of Catalonian descent a national pride is enhanced.
Garcia, Cesar. “Nationalism and Public Opinion in Contemporary Spain: the Demobilization of the Working Class in Catalonia.” Global Media Journal. 10: 17, 2010.
Garcia reports that the “top-down” approach to researching and reporting on the Catalans has put an over emphasis on the civic nature of their involvement in the predominant society. This misses the part of the society which is marginalized perhaps because of lack of nationalistic feeling.
“Unfortunately, studies on Catalan nationalism have tended to adopt a top-down paradigm, focusing on the political vindications of the ruling class and the climate of opinion created by the regional government, and minimizing other factors such as the social and political circumstances that affect public opinion,” concludes the author.
This article takes a systematic look at the realities of Catalan society by analyzing voting patterns, business and other areas specific to the Catalonia society.
Guibernau, Montserrat. Catalan Nationalism: Francoism, Transition, and Democracy. London. Routledge. 2004. Print.
Guibernau gives a historical overview of the trials and tribulations Catalan has
faced throughout the 20th century. The rise and regime of Franco almost destroyed the identity of the Catalans. But the movement went underground during the dictatorship and rose up even stronger.
Guibernau suggests that the Popular Party (PP) in Spain is so popular and powerful it no longer needs “to trade concessions for votes” with Convergència i Unió (CiU) in the Parliament (p. 2).
But a younger generation may wish to carve out its own place in the new Spanish identity which is emerging. If they are organized and clever about how they approach the modern power in Spain anything can happen.
Hargreaves, John. Freedom for Catalonia? Catalan Nationalism, Spanish Identity and the Barcelona Olympic Games. England. Cambridge University Press. 2000. Print.
Hargreaves analyzes the effect of the Barcelona Olympic Games on the struggle for Catalonian identity. He discusses the how Olympism, Nationalism and Golbalization intersected at the Barcelona Games.
He suggests the games could have been used by Spain to “further homogenized” into mainstream Spanish culture. “The Catalonia national anthem, 'Els Segadors', was included in the opening ceremony, and at that particular crucial point when the king's party entered the stadium” he reports but that was just a way the “power elite controlled” the situation rather than being a genuinely respectful nod to Catalonia (p. 131).
He also suggests that it is possible that Catalonia was pushed into the center as far as some claim. Perhaps they gained more than they lost in recognition and popularity.
Nagel, Klaus-Jurgen. “Transcending the National / Asserting the National: How Stateless Nations like Scotland, Wales and Catalonia React to European Integration.” The Australian Journal of Politics and History. 50: 1, 2004. p. 57+.
The organization of the European Union was supported by the Catalan nationalists in Spain although many were surprised by their enthusiasm.
“Catalan nationalists have always stressed their "Europeanness,"” reports Nagel.
The author analyzes the advantages of being part of the European Union and also the complications such as paying taxes to both the E.U. and to Spain.
Bibliography
“Born to Lead the Catalans; Guardiola Ready to Show Jose Who the Real Football King Is. The Daily Mail. 20 April 2010. p. 66. Retrieved from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5042480803.
Cantavella, Rosanna. “The Meaning of Destral as 'Go-Between' in the Catalan Facet and in Old Occitan.” Medium Aevum. 67: 2, 1998. p. 304.
“Catalans Tell Business to Forget Fears on Language; Firms in Spain Have Adapted to Legislation.” Western Mail. April 21, 2009. p.10. Retrieved from href="http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5037831594">Catalans Tell Business to Forget Fears on Language; Firms in Spain Have Adapted to Legislation by.
Delgado, Maria M. Calixto Bieito: a Catalan Director on the International Stage. TheatreForum. 26. 2005. Pa 10+. Retrieved from
http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5045015376.
Garcia, Cesar. “Nationalism and Public Opinion in Contemporary Spain: the Demobilization of the Working Class in Catalonia.” Global Media Journal. 10: 17, 2010.
Guibernau, Montserrat. Catalan Nationalism: Francoism, Transition, and Democracy. London. Routledge. 2004. Print.
Hargreaves, John. Freedom for Catalonia? Catalan Nationalism, Spanish Identity and the Barcelona Olympic Games. England. Cambridge University Press. 2000. Print.
Hook, David. “The Catalan Rule of the Templars: A Critical Edition and English Translation from Barcelona, Archivo De laCorona De Aragon, Cartas Reales, MS 3344.” The Modern Language Review. 101: 1, 2006. p. 269+.
Lothar, Corinna. “ Catalan Offers Cultural Choices.” The Washington Times. 4 Feb. 1999. p.6. Retrieved from
http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001874184.

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